6 Things You Need To Know About Mobile Web Design

Nearly half of marketers say their businesses lack a mobile-optimized website, according to a survey by Adobe, even though smartphones and tablets are everywhere — and web statistics prove that visits via devices are on the rise.
Competition online is fierce, and if you don’t have a mobile-friendly site to keep your customers happy, you can quickly lose your edge. But how do you get the ball rolling? Here’s a look at some of the nuts and bolts of the design process.

A good starting point is to research what type of mobile design — if any — is used by companies similar to yours.Responsive Web Design India Browse their sites thoroughly using a smartphone. When you’re finished, compare those sites against your own to get a sense of how your design stacks up, and what you can improve. For more inspiration, check out this list of 70 responsive design sites from Mobify.

Designing for mobile versus desktop

Which should you tackle first: the design for large desktop screens, or the one for mobile devices? As designer Joshua Johnson pointed out in an argument for mobile first design, starting with smaller screens forces you to create a lean, focused design. All the necessary content is built into the mobile version from the outset.

Starting with mobile doesn’t mean you’ll scale back your desktop site. Instead, Johnson points out that you can make “progressive enhancements” to supplement the large-screen experience. This type of site development goes hand-in-hand with responsive design, too.
However, there are disadvantages to this approach.
First, do you really want to rethink your entire website? While upgrading to a mobile-first design could be advantageous, it could also be an unneeded drain on your bottom line. Second, as far as aesthetics go, designing for mobile first is limiting: it might be hard to envision and execute the overall look you want your brand to have when you’re confined to a small palette.
To choose the process that makes sense for your site, talk to a professional web designer; they have the know-how to guide you through what’s best for your business.

The 6 key principles of mobile web design

Whatever philosophy you ultimately embrace, there are fundamental principles that apply to all mobile website design.

Design for mobile based on most popular and/or important content

            What are the majority of visitors looking for on your site? That’s the content you should put front and center in your design. It must be easy to find or use, or your site visitors will move on to someone else.

Everything should be available

           even if not everything is visible. In other words, make sure mobile users have access to the majority of your site’s content. It’s frustrating to look for needed information that’s simply not available on the mobile optimized site. On the other hand, just because the content is there doesn’t mean it has to be linked to via the main navigation bar.

Limit navigation options

        As noted above, you need to be choosy about the information that you put front and center. Too many menu layers, too many clicks, too many choices; you have to simplify if you want your site to be mobile friendly. David Moth of Econsultancy recommends no more than three layers of menus and a max of five or six menu items.

Buttons matter

         Thumbs aren’t the most accurate pointing device; putting buttons too close together will only lead to frustration. Who wants to keep hitting “reload” when the button you’re trying to click is “submit”? Also, avoid tiny fonts and minuscule buttons. Instead, use elements that are sized for easy clicking.

Watch your media

        While the aesthetic design of your website is extremely important, media elements can cause mobile browsers to trip up. Keep an eye out for overly large image files, bloated fonts that load too many unnecessary characters, and videos in formats — like Flash — that won’t play on certain mobile operating systems.

Pop-ups are problematic

   If you’re throwing too many pop-up surveys or sign-up boxes at your mobile visitors, they’re going to get annoyed. It’s frustrating to get rid of pop-ups on a small screen. Unless it’s absolutely necessary, avoid them.
Don’t require too much text Web Development India
Forms are a pain to fill out when you’re typing with your thumbs. Keep the text input needed to a minimum. No essays, please!

To know more about our web and mobile development service visit http://evincetech.com.
For more information, please contact us with the specifications for your project. You can email our sales team at info@evincetech.com, also you can call us at following numbers.
India: (+91) 44 42170775, (+91) 91766 40375
USA [Toll Free]: 866 220 6565

Mobile Website Design Helps Keep Customers Happy

You walk into a waiting room filled with people. They’re not watching the television; they’re not reading magazines. No, the majority of those seated have their heads down, thumbs expertly typing on mini-keypads with eyes glued to small screens.

Dorothy, we’re not in Kansas anymore!

Five years ago, this scene would have been radically different. But thanks to ever faster and cheaper data plans, mobile devices are ubiquitous; they are a rapidly growing force in the way we access information.

Without a thoughtful mobile website design, you could be losing traffic; people won’t take time to dig around on a site, or zoom in on a page to make the links large enough to click on. They’ll find another site that’s easier to use.

If you have an existing site, it’s likely that a significant number of your site visitors are mobile users. But you don’t have to take my word for it: Google’s recent release out of beta of Universal Analytics (UA) will help make the case. Among other useful tools, it lets you follow which devices are being used to access your site.Web Development India

Understanding how people access your information is an important first step in tailoring your site to best serve your visitors.

Review and test your mobile site — repeatedly

The next step is to see your site through your visitors’ eyes. Have you paid much attention to what their mobile experience is like?

It’s time you did. Browse the site extensively with your smartphone. Love your Galaxy? Grab your friend’s iPhone, too. Take your site through its paces with your nephew’s tablet. Any unique device you can get your hands on should be used to see how your site looks, functions and feels.

As you test, keep a notepad handy.

  • Think about key reasons people go to your website: Can they easily find important information or complete key transactions?
  • Take notes as you go on what’s working, what’s clunky and what’s unbearable.
  • Tag any problems, and note whether they’re specific to a certain device or a problem across all of them.

Once your list is made, you can come up with a plan of action for your website’s mobile design.

One site or many?

There are two different philosophies in designing a website for mobile devices: The device-customized site, or responsive design.

If you opt for a device-customized site, you have a few different options:

  • create a native app for each device operating system;
  • employ adaptive design, which uses pre-determined layouts based on which device is accessing the site; or
  • redirect mobile visitors to a mobile-only site, which is usually a web version of the native app option.

While device-customized design is often faster for the end user (i.e. your customer), it is typically heavier on upkeep. When making changes and updates, for example, you’ll have to modify the various versions of the website individually.

Your second option is to create one website using Responsive Web design India regardless of the device, each visitor is served the same HTML information as the desktop version of the site, but cascading style sheets (CSS) are used to adjust the layout based on screen size.

One advantage of this method is that mobile users can access all the same features that are available to desktop users. However, it can also make your site much slower — and potentially more complicated — for mobile users to navigate.

It’s time for change

There isn’t really a one-size-fits-all strategy — your business site is unique. That’s where engaging an experienced mobile web developer is extremely helpful. They can provide expert advice about the methods and design choices that will provide the best mobile experience for your customers.

Just remember: all those mobile users browsing their phones in the waiting room is a scene that is being repeated around the world. The sites that leave these smartphone-tethered users happy are popular only because they provide a mobile-friendly experience; if your site is headache-inducing, they won’t be back.

To know more about our web and mobile development service visit http://evincetech.com.
For more information, please contact us with the specifications for your project. You can email our sales team at info@evincetech.com, also you can call us at following numbers.
India: (+91) 44 42170775, (+91) 91766 40375
USA [Toll Free]: 866 220 6565

Ways to improve the website performance

1. Effective landing page

A landing page is a page designed to receive the traffic generated by a specific marketing campaign. The job of a landing page is to convert that traffic into actions, such as a phone call, sign up, download or a purchase. Provide information that serves the needs of your target audience. For example, if you are selling gift items, provide content that educates the customers on the Unique Selling Point (USP) and the ease of use of the Website Development India . This kind of information enhances your brand, builds trust and makes people want to do business with you.

2. Minimize HTTP Requests

Web page’s load time is spent downloading the different pieces-parts of the page: images, stylesheets, scripts, Flash, etc. An HTTP request is made for each one of these elements, so the more on-page components, the longer it takes for the page to render.
That being the case, the quickest way to improve site speed is to simplify your design.

1.       Combine CSS and JavaScript files to reduce HTTP requests.
2.       Avoid inline CSS and JavaScript
3.       Use CSS sprites to reduce HTTP requests
4.       Avoid inline CSS and JavaScript

3. Use right formatted image

If you have a lot of images, it’s essential to learn about the optimal format for each image. There are three common web image file formats: JPEG, GIF, and PNG. In general, you should use JPEG for realistic photos with smooth gradients and color tones. You should use GIF or PNG for images that have solid colors (such as charts and logos). GIF and PNG are similar, but PNG typically produces a lower file size.

4. Enable Browser Caching

When a web browser displays the webpage it has to load several things like your logo, CSS file, images, banner, java script and other elements.
What browser caching does is “remember” ie stores the elements/resources that the browser has already loaded in a temporary storage. When a visitor goes to another page on the website the logo or CSS file does not need to be loaded again, because the browser has them “remembered”. The end result is that the pages load much faster.
Set different caching time for all the elements/resources. The set  time period can be like “1 year” or “1 month”. The time period allocation is associated with file types and if you want to change that it can be directly changed in the code. The values above are pretty optimized for most of the WebPages. For all cacheable resources (JS and CSS files, image files, media files, PDFs, etc.), set Expires to a minimum of one week, and preferably up to one year in the future.

5.Minify Resources

Minification refers to the process of removing unnecessary or redundant data without affecting how the resource is processed by the browser – e.g. code comments and formatting, removing unused code, using shorter variable and function names, and so on. WYSIWYG resources make it easy to build a Web page, but they sometimes create messy code—and that can slow your website considerably.
You should minify your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript resources.Web Development India There are minification tools that can be used to minify and rename the development files and save them to a production directory.

Some of the minification tools:

Ø  To minifying HTML, you can usePageSpeed Insights Chrome Extension to generate an optimized version of your HTML code. Run the analysis against your HTML page and browse to the ‘Minify HTML’ rule. Click on ‘See optimized content’ to get the optimized HTML code.

Ø  To minify CSS, you can tryYUI Compressor andcssmin.js.

Ø  To minify JavaScript, try theClosure Compiler,JSMin or theYUI Compressor.

To know more about our web and mobile development service visit http://evincetech.com.
For more information, please contact us with the specifications for your project. You can email our sales team at info@evincetech.com, also you can call us at following numbers.
India: (+91) 44 42170775, (+91) 91766 40375
USA [Toll Free]: 866 220 6565